Tuesday, 11 June 2013

Enterprising scrap metal merchant with portable angle grinder sought

I've been meaning to write this post for months, since I started using the almost splendid off-road link that Camden built, following lots of persuasion by Camden Cyclists, between Agar Grove and Camley Street:
Wide cycle paths each way, separate pedestrian path, no motor vehicles. Splendid, but at each end you're faced with these almost impassable chicanes. Surely a couple of bollards would have sufficed? In the meantime could someone please take an angle grinder to at least a couple of fencing sections at each end.


Another example of wanton obstruction of an otherwise great cycle route can be found near Dartford where there's an almost splendid off road link to Crayford Station - but which you can't use without having to dismount and try to battle your bike through
I can't see the Dutch doing this and wonder why the local planners or highway engineers countenanced such a stupid thing here. Angle grinder please.

I was reminded of the gate above today when I used the segregated cycle path that runs alongside the unforgiving A1055 Watermead Way towards the Tottenham Hale gyratory, but first I negotiated this obstacle that needs the attention of an angle grinder
Anyway, I reached the end of the segregated track and faced this obstacle:
 and discovered that my handlebars were too high to fit through the cycle bit. I tried every which way to get out and in the end had to call out to a passer by and ask her if she'd take the bicycle off me as I passed it over the ironwork and lower it to the ground. I won't be using that bit of segregated route again until someone with an angle grinder has visited
A couple of days I came across this dangerous looking cycle farcility entering Lynton Road in Haringey and decided to take a photo of it
 Then a bloke on a bike came past and I decided to take a photo of him weaving through the chicane, but he crashed into it, so that's off my route until someone's used an angle grinder
And, finally, good advice to 'lock the frame and both wheels to the stand' at Wood Green Shopping Centre
only with two D-locks you can't on these particular stands, so let's get these cut down too
Postscript
Just after I posted this Anders Swanson tweeted the following photo he'd taken of a presentation by Ida Sabelis at this year's Velo-City conference. Wouldn't it be great if cycle facility engineers were required to use the images in the bottom half of the photo as the bike logos painted on the ground. That should stop them from installing such barking mad barriers as the examples above.


6 comments:

buffalobillbikeblog said...

Yeah, the gates are bad, but those stands are appalling. A poorly designed solution looking for a problem.

KruidigMeisje said...

I know we have similar gates in nl on cyclepaths. Where nature parks start, to keep the sheep inside. Though those are manageble by bike, i must admit.

Lovelo Bicycles said...

If you think it's bad imagine how it is for people on tricycles or hand cycles, they are effectively banned from using this route. In which case you should be able to challenge them under the public sector equality duty

http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/advice-and-guidance/public-sector-equality-duty/introduction-to-the-equality-duty/

I'd rather the odd kid on a moped using the route rather than having to go through all that and disabled people not being able to use it.

whatter said...

No good for tandems either, as we found the other day negotiating numerous gates on cycle paths around East London (Hackney/Walthamstow onto the Lea Valley canal route)

The Ranty Highwayman said...

Pure tosh, take the gates out - the odd properly placed bollard is all you need if cars are really expected to be a problem, otherwise most of this stuff is only so much scrap!

Aanchal said...

Wow great! I love the work done with the Angle grinder.. It is really a convenient tool for all kind of works..Even makes work easy and reliable.